Chinese SEO Just Got a Little Bit Easier

As of a few weeks ago, HitTail now supports Chinese characters and the major Chinese search engines such as Baidu and Sogou.

After many hours of toiling, tweaking and testing, we have worked out the undocumented kinks and are now live and supporting a handful of Chinese language domains (with more coming on board soon).

If you are a Chinese SEO or perform Baidu SEO, HitTail is now a viable option for your long tail keyword needs.

New Feature: 1-Click Articles

Whew…our most requested feature – being able to order a custom article for any keyword suggestion – launched yesterday. It was a lot of work but we’re excited at the prospect of being able to offer articles for any keyword suggestion.

We’re backed by a network of 80,000 writers with a wide range of knowledge and areas of expertise, but most importantly we’re committed to providing top quality keyword-focused and completely custom articles in 2-3 days (but so far turnaround times have averaged 24 hours).

Check out this 60-second screencast for a bit more about how it works:

HitTail Undergoing Maintenance

HitTail is undergoing some unscheduled but necessary hardware upgrades. This will only affect the ability to log into the HitTail user interface, and temporarly there will be no collecting of data. It will not impact how your pages are served. We plan to have it up and running again by Sunday.

Update: HitTail is back online and fully functional once again. Thanks for your patience.

Perfect Keyword Tool for the Recession

You’d think that after four years, the incredibly actionable HitTail keyword tool would start losing it’s appeal, but as it turns out, the tough economic conditions are actually just opening Marketers’ eyes to the wisdom of targeting the long tail. It’s an easy and systematic method of bringing in well qualified prospective customers and audience to your website without spending a dime.

Well, technically it’s $10/mo and your time writing.

But that’s the perfect way to spend your money right now. Dig in and fortify by producing copious perfectly optimized content. It will likely produce some new customers today, but when economic conditions improve, you will have performed the content-build already, and be positioned for a real take-off!

Our competitors know this, and are bidding in AdWords on our keywords. Ha Ha Ha! It’s nice to be acknowledged as the leader. Unfortunately, try as I might, I can’t find pricing on their website. I bet THEY’RE not $10/mo.

So stick with the actionable keyword tool leader, who is also the best priced. We want to be your best friend during this recession.

Corn Syrup, Mercury, Bees and CCD: The Long Tail of News

Forgive me for diverging from this blog’s normal topic of marketing, but I feel that the importance of researching the long tail of news cannot be understated and the following could be a good example of this. The following chain of events occurred from reading the news — not from using HitTail — but I think it just goes to show what can happen when you dig deep into data. Hopefully this is not lost on today’s investigative journalists. I hope one of you will find this story and research it further than I can.

This morning I read on a story buried on page 8 of my morning paper that mercury has been found in a large percentage of corn syrup. An hour later, I read a new column on the New York Times website about Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) that is quietly ravaging American bees and endangering our food supply. CCD has been a mystery since its discovery in 2006. Yet today I noticed one key aspect that had been left out of prior reporting that I had read. Honeybees are fed on corn syrup while being moved between farms. Corn syrup that has now been found to likely contain mercury. While a minor amount to humans, this could be toxic to bees.

Part of the problem of CCD is that once bees are infected, they often leave the hive never to return. That makes diagnosing them difficult. Yet, according to Wikipedia, symptoms in mercury poisoning include include sensory impairment (vision, hearing, speech), disturbed sensation and a lack of coordination. Maybe the bees can’t find their way back. It probably also lowers their defenses, making them susceptible to other diseases.

Bee keepers, please try feeding bees on something else other than corn syrup. Reporters, keep digging in the long tail for potential news angles like this one. I don’t know if there is any correlation between the two stories, but both are important issues that independently deserve more press.